Creative

Eight rotary phones – an art installation

Late last year, I helped run the University of Sydney annual graduation exhibition for the Architecture faculty. One of the things I was responsible for was helping set up an “artistic” installation. Architects have strange concepts of what is and isn’t art, and apparently an isolated network of eight rotary phones qualifies.

An old rotary phone

The concept was simple: throw eight hipster phones around with a few numbers and see what happens. You could call each other around the building. I’m sorry, were you expecting more? Nope. That’s art for you.

It did, however, give me an opportunity to learn the basics of traditional phone systems – from things like pulses, tones, VOIPs, PABX, switchboards, right down to the physical labour of installing more than 200 meters of phone cable across a building.

On the night itself, I’m happy to say that the installation (in both the technical and artistic sense) was a success. I’ve never heard such creative instant role playing or even inappropriate words said to would-be employers.

… I wonder how long I can keep that phone network running before people realise it’s not a legitimate part of their system?

Creative

USyd Architecture Exhibition website released

Today I’d like to officially release the Usyd Architecture Exhibition website.

USyd Graduation Exhibition Website Homepage

USyd Graduation Exhibition Website Catalogue

Taken from the site itself:

The University of Sydney Architecture Faculty puts together an annual exhibition for its graduating Bachelors and Masters students. This gives students an opportunity to showcase their best projects. An event is held to exhibit these works, and along with this a hardcopy curated catalogue and a digital catalogue is released.

So as expected, the site hosts this year’s digital catalogue, and will continue to host future year’s submissions. There are currently about 100 submissions listed across five diverse project briefs. Feel free to look around, but I’d like to issue a word of warning to my readers that you might find the project descriptions more affiliated towards the romantic and social science-esque narrative.

If you’re wondering why a lot of the work is more art than design, I’d like to highlight that we aren’t incapable of making functional, logical and real-world problem solving designs. However it does seem that a lot of students aren’t taught how to write, and end up romanticizing the design into an artwork. That said, some designs do aim to be utopian and speculative, but I guess if you’re going to be spending the rest of your life looking at glazing and bolts, you’re excused for a little fun during university.

I’d also like to get the chance to highlight my own submission on the website.

Flinders Street Hotel Proposal Render

My project this semester involved proposing a Flinders St Hotel. It’s a rather large scale project, and would take too long to explain fully, even for the generous space that the online catalogue allows. I recommend viewing my project page and reading the full description there. It gives an overview of the project.

Finally, I’d like to quickly highlight the under-the-hood of the website. The website runs on vtemplate, is responsive, and has it’s technology colophon visible at its humans.txt. In particular, it was designed to be quite generic and highlight the work itself, and function on a phone or iPad as you scanned QR codes during the event itself. The entire website is open-source (view repository), and I’ve just tagged 1.0.0 today :)