Dion Moult Seriously who ever reads this description.

The Architecture Graduate Exhibition – University of Sydney

On the 5th of December, there will be the Architecture Graduate Exhibition at the University of Sydney. Yes, that’s right, my Bachelors degree is over! But before I move on to Masters, other projects, and life, I would like to dedicate a post to the exhibition itself.

The Architecture Graduate Exhibition is an annual event which showcases the work of all the graduating students. This year, it’ll feature the the graduating Bachelors, who show projects tackling the controversial redevelopment of Flinders Street Station in Melbourne, and the graduating Masters, who’ll showcase three distinct projects. Our organising team of five including myself are happy to present “ANALOGUE” (that’s an artsy theme, in case you haven’t guessed).

Architecture Graduate Exhibition - USyd - Logo

If you are available in Sydney on the 5th of December, be sure to drop in at the Wilkinson Building at 148 City Road around 6PM for live music (which I shall participate), free booze (which I shall graciously donate), and perhaps some design here and there.

This year shall also feature the release of the first online graduate exhibition catalogue. This’ll be reused in future years. It’s still under wraps but will be released at UsydArchExhibition.com once I have enough entries. You may also follow our Analogue Architecture Exhibition Facebook page where we post ongoings – you might witness the 200 plinths we built (don’t mind the mess in the backdrop, that’s the natural state of a creative environment).

Analogue Architecture Exhibition Plinths

Back to work!

A bullet point blog post because I’m back in business

What a hectic month. Will post about projects later, but here’s a bit of here and there:

More posts later.

Architecture IRC channel on Freenode

Most of my readers will know that despite the majority of my blog posts being about technical content, I actually study architecture. The crossover between these two fields from my experience seems to be rather minimal. The computer geeks know a little about buildings, but not enough to do much about it. Similarly, the architecture folks dabble with computers, creating fields such as algorithmic architecture and parametric design. This dabbling rarely turns into anything serious from either party, and it’s quite hard to find an online community of those who are interested in both. I hope to change that with the new architecture IRC channel on freenode.

I recall lurking with the hopes of meeting another architect in #architect for a while. Occasionally someone would come but never stay, and the original channel founder left and hasn’t been back for a year or so. For this reason I have now registered ##architect (the double hash prefix due to Freenode’s channel rules) and will lurk yet again. I hope by writing this blog post other architects might notice and pop in.

What is IRC and how do I join the architecture IRC channel?

I realise that many architects might not be so familiar with what IRC is. IRC can be thought of as an online chat room divided into channels, which represent common topics of discussion. These channels are grouped into networks, which are simply organisations that provide these channels. So the full access details you need are as such:

Network: Freenode
Channel: ##architect

Just like you need a program such as Skype in order to chat with others using Skype, you will need an IRC program to chat with others on IRC. I recommend using downloading Quassel – it works on Windows, Mac and Linux.

If you don’t want to use a program, you can easily chat using the online Freenode webchat service. It’s super easy to get started, just type in a nickname for yourself and put ##architect in the channel box, and press connect.

Finally, don’t worry if nobody seems to be around, just stick around and we’ll respond when we’re back at a computer.

See you in the architecture IRC channel!

Edit: some people have popped up but leave quite quickly. Small IRC communities are frequently inactive but need people to stick around for it to grow. Please consider waiting a few hours, or just connecting frequently and when somebody else is also around we’ll have a chat.

Sydney revue coming up from the architecture faculty!

As some might remember, I was involved in a Sydney revue last year by the university of Sydney architecture faculty as the musical director. It was called Game of Homes (a shameless pun on the Game of Thrones series). Not only was I involved with music, it also gave me the wonderful opportunity to create a 3D animation for its opening sequence based on the original (and very well done) Game of Thrones sequence. You can view the animation sequence and corresponding revue poster in this post.

As this is an annual event, I’m happy to say that I’m again involved in it this year (as music again) and would like to present Floorless, a spaghetti western with a particularly complex pun for a title. It’s a joke on both the film Lawless, and on Flawless with an architectural twist. Get it? Nope? That’s alright. Me neither.

Sydney revue architecture

Anyway, you can tell that this is a quality Sydney revue because it has a quality poster. This means that if you’re in Sydney on the 5th, 6th or 7th of September, you should buy a cheap ticket and watch it.

Sydney revue poster alternative

It contains all the right ingredients for a successful western. These include bandits, sherrifs, the town stranger, the town drunk, the fastest shot in the West (which may sometime be the town drunk), the banjo brandishing hillbilly, the lonely harmonica player, a whip*, the mayor, Mexicans, the fine lass, and a Final standoff with capital F.

Also, there used to be an official revue website somewhere but as I can’t find it I assume that someone forgot to renew the domain and the site no longer exists.

Cheers, and see you at the event!

* the whip may or may not be used at the actual event, and audience are recommended to not buy tickets for the front row.

Blender panoramic renders howto and demonstration

Doing a Blender panoramic render isn’t easy. This is because you can’t actually see what you’re going to create in the regular OpenGL-shaded 3D view. In fact, even when looking through the Blender camera, you won’t see what you’re going to end up with.

Blender panoramic renders with Blender Internal renderer

The technique is actually rather simple: just select the camera. Then in the object data settings panel, just click the panoramic button and play with the focal length until you get something you want. You can see an example of how to create a simple Blender panoramic render in the screenshot below:

Blender panoramic settings

You’ll soon discover is that you can only actually see what you’re going to get when you hit the render button. If you’re using the internal Blender renderer, this’ll become a pain really quickly. This is because you’ll have to constantly hit render and wait for the image to come up.

Blender panoramic renders with Cycles renderer

However if you switch the scene to Cycles Renderer, things become easier. This is because Cycles provides a real-time rendering view. Just set one window open to rendered view and you’ll see what you’re going to get (roughly) in real time. At the same time, you’ll notice that Cycles opens up new options on how your panoramic render should be like: the type of panoramic – whether it’s fish eye, equidistant, or rectangular, and how many degrees the field of view is.

Blender cycles panoramic camera settings

Now comes the fun part, actually building your scene. The best strategy is to have planned out your scene beforehand on paper so you know its composition. With panoramic renders, if you haven’t already got a scene built, now is your chance to bend reality in a Dali-esque manner and have fun with perspective.

Once your composition is planned out, create simple cubes and planes as proxy objects for the rough locations of where your scene objects are going to be. Then slowly replace them with the more detailed meshes of what you want to make.

Another useful tip is to use the Blender preview window. In Cycles, when in camera view, just press shift-b and drag and drop a cropped portion of your screen, and it’ll only render that area. This keeps rendering times low. There are plenty of other tips on how to reduce rendering times, so I won’t repeat them all here.

Below you can see a panoramic render I did a few months ago which uses the above techniques. As you can see, I’ve blended several scenes together with varying perspectives, which was only possible with a panoramic render.

Blender panoramic render

Good luck, and create those awesome renders!

← Back in Time Back to the Future! →