Creative

Eight rotary phones – an art installation

Late last year, I helped run the University of Sydney annual graduation exhibition for the Architecture faculty. One of the things I was responsible for was helping set up an “artistic” installation. Architects have strange concepts of what is and isn’t art, and apparently an isolated network of eight rotary phones qualifies.

An old rotary phone

The concept was simple: throw eight hipster phones around with a few numbers and see what happens. You could call each other around the building. I’m sorry, were you expecting more? Nope. That’s art for you.

It did, however, give me an opportunity to learn the basics of traditional phone systems – from things like pulses, tones, VOIPs, PABX, switchboards, right down to the physical labour of installing more than 200 meters of phone cable across a building.

On the night itself, I’m happy to say that the installation (in both the technical and artistic sense) was a success. I’ve never heard such creative instant role playing or even inappropriate words said to would-be employers.

… I wonder how long I can keep that phone network running before people realise it’s not a legitimate part of their system?

Technical

Installing Gentoo on Android with chroot

Note: recently edited 8th Nov 2014

Installing Gentoo in a chroot alongside Android is easy, so if you already use Gentoo and have an Android phone, there’s really no reason why you shouldn’t do it. With a ginormous phablet like the Samsung Galaxy Note 2 and a bluetooth keyboard, you can get a super-mobile full Linux workstation everywhere you go.

Before we begin, let’s see the pretty pictures. Here’s Larry saying hello :) (Installing a talking cow should be the top priority once the base system is up and running)

Larry saying hello on Android

… and of course a shot of emerging stuff …

Gentoo on Android compiling stuff

… and finally we’re running Enlightenment 17 with the Webkit-based Midori browser with X, accessed via (Tight)VNC …

E17 on Android with Gentoo Linux

Installing Gentoo on Android

Prerequisites first: you’ll need a rooted device. You’ll also need a terminal with busybox. I recommend Android Terminal Emulator and busybox by stericson. I would also recommend installing Hacker’s Keyboard, which gives you a full keylayout.

Installing is rather straightforward: modern Android phones usually run on ARMv7 so just follow the appropriate handbook. If you are installing it onto your internal storage (not on an external SD), you can skip to chapter 5 :)

You will need to be root to install, so su - in your terminal emulator of choice. Similarly, remount Android into read-write so that you can create the necessary files for Gentoo with mount -o remount,rw /. Finally, remember to install in /data/gentoo instead of /mnt/gentoo so to not conflict with Android’s mounting preferences.

Since we’re only installing a chroot and not booting alongside android, you can safely skip configuring the kernel, configuring fstab, configuring networking, and setting up the bootloader.

When mounting, you will need to do so as root user, and use the busybox implementation for --rbind support, as so:

$ su -
[ ... superuser access granted ... ]
$ cd /
$ mount -t proc proc /data/gentoo/proc
$ busybox mount --rbind /dev /data/gentoo/dev
$ busybox mount --rbind /sys /data/gentoo/sys
$ chroot /data/gentoo /bin/bash
[ ... now in the chroot ... ]
$ source /etc/profile

This is assuming you’ve put Gentoo in /data/gentoo

Android quirks

There doesn’t seem to be a /dev/fd on Android, so let’s fix that:

[ ... in Gentoo chroot ... ]
$ cd /dev
$ ln -s /proc/self/fd`

Portage won’t be able to download files as it doesn’t download as root, but instead as another user by default. No problem:

[ ... in /etc/portage/make.conf ... ]
FEATURES="-userfetch"`

Sometimes I’ve noticed that on bad reboots the /etc/resolv.conf can get reset. This will cause host resolving issues. Resolving is as easy as:

[ ... in /etc/resolv.conf ... ]
nameserver 8.8.4.4
nameserver 8.8.8.8`

It will be a good idea to set your main user to the same UID as the Android normal user. Also, running id -a in android will show you that your user is part of various reserved Android groups. To fix issues such as your Gentoo user’s (in)ability to go online or use bluetooth, just create these groups in your Gentoo install with matching GIDs, and add your user to these groups. Here’s a list of Android UIDS and GIDS. For example, I needed to add my Gentoo user to groups with GIDs 3003 and 3004 before it could successfully go online.

If you want an X server, VNC will do the trick. I recommend android-vnc-viewer 24-bit colour seems to work, and perhaps change the input method to touchpad rather than touchscreen so it’s relatively usable.

Finally, with no fan and big heatsink on a mobile phone, you might find yourself running hot. So even though monsters like the Galaxy Note 2 have 4 cores, I recommend sticking it to MAKEOPT="-j2"